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Isabel Wilkerson – Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents

Filed under: The Playlist — Thomas @ 18:35

2022-02-22
18:35

Isabel Wilkerson - Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents

#book #dei

"Like other old houses, [...] has an unseen skeleton, a caste system that is as central to its operation as are the studs and joists that we cannot see in the physical buildings we call home. Caste is the infrastructure of our divisions. It is the architecture of human hierarchy, the subconscious code of instructions for maintaining [...] a [...] social order."

Caste has taken the lead in my library as the most highlighted book, and is a deep exploration of Caste as the lens through which to see discrimination, drawing parallels between Europe, the United States, and India, providing a universal framing.

“Young people,” he said, “I would like to present to you a fellow untouchable from the United States of America.” King was floored. He had not expected that term to be applied to him. He was, in fact, put off by it at first.

Taken from The Playlist - a curated perspective on the intersection of form and content (subscribe, discuss)

9 Ways We Self Sabotage

Filed under: The Playlist — Thomas @ 20:21

2022-02-21
20:21

9 Ways We Self Sabotage

#survey #productivity

"Saboteurs are the voices in your head that generate negative emotions in the way you handle life’s everyday challenges. They represent automated patterns in your mind for how to think, feel, and respond. They cause all of your stress, anxiety, self-doubt, frustration, restlessness, and unhappiness. They sabotage your performance, wellbeing, and relationships."

Positive Intelligence is a mental fitness framework and, among other concepts, taught me helpful practical ways to deal with stress, both professionally and personally.

Take the test or read more on How we self-sabotage

Taken from The Playlist - a curated perspective on the intersection of form and content (subscribe, discuss)

You are not my papa

Filed under: Kids,New York City — Thomas @ 02:30

2022-02-18
02:30

Last night I rode our bike home from Brooklyn, with my daughter crying loudly "You are not my papa!" most of the way.

We were a few minutes late picking her up from her class, and she was the last one there, crying in the arms of the teacher, and yelling something loudly, too loud to understand.
I picked her up, hugged her, asked what's wrong and tried to calm her down, but she wasn't having it. I put her in the back of our bike, strapping her in, checking with my son what she could be saying. We finally started making out that she was saying "not my papa".

I tried to convince her that I am, in fact, her papa, but she just kept repeating the same thing. We started our ride back home, and at the first red light I was acutely aware of her still yelling the same thing while standing still in traffic next to other bikes. What would I do if I was stuck in traffic next to a vehicle with a crying child yelling "You are not my papa?", I wondered. I started asking her questions like, "what hair color does your papa have?" to get her to stop and think, and I would respond, "that's interesting, just like me". I'd ask a few questions like that until the lights turned green.

I was hoping this would work for all the stops on our 25 minute ride home, and I was hoping we'd not run into any police cars along the way, just in case. Of course, two minutes later, I was parallel with a string of five police cars, all with their lights flashing. I kept repeating the questions at every stop, until she fell asleep as she usually does on the bike.

She slept all the way through dinner, and the next morning at breakfast I asked her, "who's your papa?" And she beamed at me and yelled, "you are my papa!"

My best guess at what happened is that at pickup she saw a string of papas pick up their kids, but didn't see me, and started saying "you are not my papa" at every other papa, until I was the last one to show up. I'll never show up last again.

Quick way to process an Inbox folder in Obsidian

Filed under: Obsidian,Organize — Thomas @ 23:11

2022-01-22
23:11

Obsidian's Gems of the Year 2021 nomination has been a great source of cool ideas to add tweaks to my Obsidian setup.

In particular, Quick Capture (mac/iOS) and Inbox Processing was a great gem to uncover as I try and implement the weekly review stage of my Second Brain/PARA setup!

I noticed that the archive/move script was a little slow, taking several seconds to open up the dialog for selecting a folder, breaking my flow. I checked the code and noticed it built a set of folders recursively.

I simplified the code for my use case, removing the archive folder path, and using the file explorer's built in move dialog (which is much faster) and a callback to advance.

The resulting gist is Obsidian: Archive current file and then open next file in folder (Templater script) · GitHub

I'm sure it could be improved further if I understood the execution, variable scope, and callback model better, but this is good enough for me!

I get very little coding time these days, and I hate working in an environment I haven't had a chance to really master yet. It's all trial and error through editing a javascript file in a markdown editor with no syntax highlighting. But it's still a nice feeling when you can go in and out of a code base in a few hours and scratch the itch you had.

Amazing Marvin and KeyCombiner

Filed under: friction — Thomas @ 03:27

2021-06-03
03:27

I recently came across an excellent tool called KeyCombiner that helps you practice keyboard shortcuts (3 sets for free, $29/6 months for more sets). I spent some time to create a set for Amazing Marvin, my current todo manager of choice.

The shareable URL to use in KeyCombiner is https://keycombiner.com/collecting/collections/shared/f1f78977-0920-4888-a86d-d00a7201502e

I generated it from the printed PDF version of Marvin's keyboard guide and a bunch of manual editing, in a google sheet.

Keyboard shortcuts are great timesavers and help reduce friction, but it's getting harder to learn them properly, and this tool has been a great help for some other apps, and for figuring out common shortcuts across apps, and for picking custom shortcuts (in other apps) that don't conflict. If this is a problem you recognize, give KeyCombiner a try.

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